SAT vs ACT Scores – Concordance Table

Not sure how your SAT score translates into an ACT score? Want to translate your ACT score into an SAT score?

Below is a concordance table published by the College Board to help you compare/contrast between the two exams. For more info go here: https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/pdf/higher-ed-brief-sat-concordance.pdf

act sat concordance table

Early Action and Early Decision Colleges

If you plan to apply early action or early decision to colleges, here’s a reminder that Early Action is non-binding and Early Decision is binding. Most schools have a deadline of November 1 to apply early.

Here’s more information from the College Board on Early Decision versus Early Action:

Early decision (ED) and early action (EA) plans can be beneficial to students — but only to those who have thought through their college options carefully and have a clear preference for one institution.

Early decision versus early action
Early decision plans are binding — a student who is accepted as an ED applicant must attend the college. Early action plans are nonbinding — students receive an early response to their application but do not have to commit to the college until the normal reply date of May 1. Counselors need to make sure that students understand this key distinction between the two plans.

Approximately 450 colleges have early decision or early action plans, and some have both. Some colleges offer a nonbinding option called single-choice early action, under which applicants may not apply ED or EA to any other college.

ED plans have come under fire as unfair to students from families with low incomes, since they do not have the opportunity to compare financial aid offers. This may give an unfair advantage to applicants from families who have more financial resources.

ED applicants

  • Apply early (usually in November) to first-choice college.
  • Receive an admission decision from the college well in advance of the usual notification date (usually by December).
  • Agree to attend the college if accepted and offered a financial aid package that is considered adequate by the family.
  • Apply to only one college early decision.
  • Apply to other colleges under regular admission plans.
  • Withdraw all other applications if accepted by ED.
  • Send a nonrefundable deposit well in advance of May 1.

EA applicants

  • Apply early.
  • Receive an admission decision early in the admission cycle (usually in January or February).
  • Consider acceptance offer; do not have to commit upon receipt.
  • Apply to other colleges under regular admission plans.
  • Give the college a decision no later than the May 1 national response date.

 

Who should apply early? Applying to an ED or EA plan is most appropriate for a student who:

  • Has researched colleges extensively.
  • Is absolutely sure that the college is the first choice.
  • Has found a college that is a strong match academically, socially and geographically.
  • Meets or exceeds the admission profile for the college for SAT® scores, GPA and class rank.
  • Has an academic record that has been consistently solid over time.

Applying to an ED or EA plan is not appropriate for a student who:

  • Has not thoroughly researched colleges.
  • Is applying early just to avoid stress and paperwork.
  • Is not fully committed to attending the college.
  • Is applying early only because friends are.
  • Needs a strong senior fall semester to bring grades up.

Click here for a list of Early Action Schools

Click here for a list of Early Decision Schools

 

A Few Telling Freshman Trends

The New York Times published a very interesting article on some telling freshman trends.

In 1967, 43% of people answering the survey didn’t apply to any universities. The second largest percentage was 21% which applied to ONE university. By comparison, in 2016 21% of those surveyed were applying to 7 to 10 universities.

In 1974, 77% of those surveyed were attending their first choice university. In 2016 57% are attending their first choice.

More results in the photo below or on the NY Times website.

freshman survey

Dorm Essentials You Shouldn’t Forget (and Some You Should Skip)

For those former Band students already traveling to the US to begin college and for those already dreaming of going in 1, 2, 3 years…here’s some advice on dorm essentials from a NY Times article:

Everyone in your life will have advice on what you absolutely need to take to college. Multicolored sticky notes? Crucial. A rug by your bed? You’ll die without one! But from my experience dorming for the past four years, I’ve learned that smaller, sometimes forgotten items can sometimes have the biggest impact.

Sure, I was grateful I had a hanging shoe organizer, but it’s little things like pot holders or specialized kitchenware that made my dorm life a little more comfortable. Everyone knows to bring a good pair of noise-reducing headphones and a bathroom caddy for dorm living, so here are a few items that will lighten your load in small but frequent ways, plus a few things you’re better off leaving at home.

What You’ll Want to Have:

  • Whiteboard
  • Mini stapler
  • Portable phone charger
  • Beach towel
  • Clear fruit bowl

What You’re Better Off Without:

  • Excessive school apparel
  • Rugs
  • Decorative items (that aren’t posters)

Read more by going to the full article.

Best-College-Dorms

6 Common Reasons College Applications Get Rejected

Below, college admissions deans share the most common reasons why applications get rejected at their schools and offer tips on submitting a competitive application. Source: US News

1. The applicant doesn’t meet the academic threshold. The types of courses that students take in high school and the grades they receive in those classes are the best indicators of how well a student will perform in college, experts say.
Most colleges will base an admissions decision on all aspects of a student’s application and not just grades and test scores, but admissions counselors want to know that students have a strong enough foundation to handle challenging courses at their institution.
“We have a bottom floor that if they don’t achieve over a number in one of those categories, then it is an overall denial of admissions,” says LeAnn Hughes, vice president for enrollment and marketing at Illinois Wesleyan University.

2. The application is incomplete. Missing test scores, recommendation letters and other application materials will delay the review process for applicants.
Colleges are likely to ask students to submit missing pieces of their application before the deadline, but it’s better to double-check the requirements first.
“Do homework ahead of time to know what the institutions are requiring and to know what the deadlines are, because those are the easiest ways to make sure the application is reviewed,” says Heidi Meyer, executive director of admissions at the University of Minnesota—Twin Cities.

3. The school isn’t a good fit. Admissions officers don’t expect teens to have concrete career and academic plans, but they do want students to understand the college’s mission and have a clear idea of how the school can help them meet their goals. That means researching the institution before applying to make sure the college offers the type of education and experience that the applicant needs. Teens also need to think about what they can offer the college’s community.
“If we have a student whose essay indicates that they really want a large school experience or they write about how they wanted to major in something that we didn’t necessarily have the appropriate major to get them where they are going, we would want to have a conversation with that student,” Hughes says. Illinois Wesleyan has fewer than 2,000 undergraduate students.

4. There are too many errors. Don’t put Howard University when you’re applying to Hampton. Admissions officers may be willing to overlook a minor mistake, but submitting applications filled with typos and errors shows admissions counselors that the applicant isn’t serious about their institution, or that the applicant doesn’t have sufficient writing skills to succeed at the college, experts say.
“Make sure that you have two, three sets of eyes looking at your credentials before you submit,” says Angela Nixon Boyd, dean of admissions at Hampton University.

5.The student has a record of behavior problems. “A lot of colleges and universities pay close attention to character, and if students have had issues with suspensions or anything of that regard, that’s going to really impact the decision,” Nixon Boyd says.

A suspension isn’t an automatic reason for denial. Cell phone violations or tardiness won’t have the same impact as a history of fighting or being disruptive in class, Nixon Boyd says.
Students with suspensions on their records can explain those incidents in their application.

6. The demand is much greater than the supply. “The problem for us is that we have so many more qualified, talented, interesting people than we can enroll,” Lee Coffin, dean of admissions and financial aid at Dartmouth College, says. Dartmouth accepted about 10 percent of the 20,000-plus applications they received in 2016, Coffin says.
“We’re looking to populate the class with people who are going to complement the community that we’re trying to build,” he says. What the community needs changes from year to year and can vary in anything from academics to diversity or athletics. Teens who clearly articulate their interests, goals and potential are most likely to be considered for a spot in the freshman class.
“From a student’s perspective, the opportunity is: ‘How do I write essays that introduce my personal narrative, my aspirations, my academic interests, as clearly as I can? How do I get recommendations that introduce me to this admissions officer in a way that rounds out the letter grade or maybe the test score that is in that subject area?'”

 

Preparing ‘Emerging Adults’ for College & Beyond

Great article by the NY Times discussing Preparing ‘Emerging Adults’ for College and Beyond.

Dr. Ginsberg works with clients on lack of emotional readiness and academic and “adulting” skills, as well as on social anxiety — issues that can become more apparent in college and can lead to students’ lives’ unraveling.

So how can a person develop these skills? In the article there is a list of “exposure tasks” to help students develop strategies for coping with possible challenges and “assertively get their needs met, or manage circumstances that do not go the way that they wished,” Dr. Ginsberg said.

Some of these tasks may seem oddly fundamental, and they aren’t all relevant to everyone. For example, Dr. Ginsberg may ask a perfectionist to turn in an imperfect assignment, she said, “so that they learn to tolerate the anxiety — that it was not so bad after all, that the outcome does not define them and that the incident did not propel catastrophic consequences, as they might have predicted.”

Academic Readiness Challenges:

  • Adhere to a schedule consistently.
  • Ask for help with or clarification on an assignment or test material.
  • Walk into a class that’s already begun, rather than skipping it because you were running late.
  • Speak to your teacher or professor after class.
  • Make a phone call and ask basic (including “obvious” or “awkward”) questions.
  • Call and make your own doctor and dentist appointments.

So….are you ready?

 

UChicago Releases Essay Questions

The University of Chicago has long been renowned for its provocative essay questions. They can be approached with utter seriousness, complete fancy, or something in between.

Each year UChicago emails newly admitted and current College students and asks them for essay topics. Below are this year’s questions.

Essay Option 2 and 5 are my personal favorites! What are yours?

2017-18 UChicago Supplement:
Question 1 (Required):
How does the University of Chicago, as you know it now, satisfy your desire for a particular kind of learning, community, and future? Please address with some specificity your own wishes and how they relate to UChicago.

Question 2 (Optional):
Share with us a few of your favorite books, poems, authors, films, plays, pieces of music, musicians, performers, paintings, artists, blogs, magazines, or newspapers. Feel free to touch on one, some, or all of the categories listed, or add a category of your own.

Extended Essay Questions:
(Required; Choose one)

Essay Option 1.
“The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress.” – Joseph Joubert

Sometimes, people talk a lot about popular subjects to assure ‘victory’ in conversation or understanding, and leave behind topics of less popularity, but great personal or intellectual importance. What do you think is important but under-discussed?

-Anonymous Suggestion

Essay Option 2.
Due to a series of clerical errors, there is exactly one typo (an extra letter, a removed letter, or an altered letter) in the name of every department at the University of Chicago. Oops! Describe your new intended major. Why are you interested in it and what courses or areas of focus within it might you want to explore? Potential options include Commuter Science, Bromance Languages and Literatures, Pundamentals: Issues and Texts, Ant History… a full list of unmodified majors ready for your editor’s eye is available here: https://collegeadmissions.uchicago.edu/academics/majors-minors.

-Inspired by Josh Kaufman, Class of 2018

Essay Option 3.
Earth. Fire. Wind. Water. Heart! Captain Planet supposes that the world is made up of these five elements. We’re familiar with the previously-noted set and with actual elements like hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, but select and explain another small group of things (say, under five) that you believe compose our world.

-Inspired by Dani Plung, Class of 2017

Essay Option 4.
The late New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham once said “Fashion is the armor to survive the reality of everyday life. I don’t think you could do away with it. It would be like doing away with civilization.” Tell us about your “armor.”

-Inspired by Adam Berger, Class of 2020

Essay Option 5.
Fans of the movie Sharknado say that they enjoy it because “it’s so bad, it’s good.” Certain automobile owners prefer classic cars because they “have more character.” And recently, vinyl record sales have skyrocketed because it is perceived that they have a warmer, fuller sound. Discuss something that you love not in spite of but rather due to its quirks or imperfections.

-Inspired by Alex Serbanescu, Class of 2021

Essay Option 6.
In the spirit of adventurous inquiry, pose your own question or choose one of our past prompts. Be original, creative, thought provoking. Draw on your best qualities as a writer, thinker, visionary, social critic, sage, citizen of the world, or future citizen of the University of Chicago; take a little risk, and have fun.

 

Harvard Rescinds Acceptances for At Least Ten Students

Harvard Rescinds Acceptances for At Least Ten Students for Obscene Memes

harvard pennant

There has been a lot of news over the last 2 days on Harvard’s decision to rescind offers to at least 10 students. Read the full article from The Harvard Crimson – highlights below.

Harvard College rescinded admissions offers to at least ten prospective members of the Class of 2021 after the students traded sexually explicit memes and messages that sometimes targeted minority groups in a private Facebook group chat.

The description for the official Facebook group for the Class of 2021, set up and maintained by the Admissions Office, disclaims all administrative responsibility for “unofficial groups” and warns members their admissions offers can be rescinded under specific circumstances.

“As a reminder, Harvard College reserves the right to withdraw an offer of admission under various conditions including if an admitted student engages in behavior that brings into question his or her honesty, maturity, or moral character,” the description reads.

Harvard admitted 5.2 percent of applicants to the Class of 2021, accepting 2,056 of the nearly 40,000 total applicants. Roughly 84 percent of students invited to join the class accepted their offer, marking the highest yield rate in recent memory.

 

 

Taking SAT Subject Tomorrow? What Students Need to Know for Test Day

SAT Subject: What Students Need to Know for Test Day

Must Bring

  • Their admission ticket (sign in to print ticket)
  • Acceptable photo ID
  • Two No. 2 pencils
  • An approved calculator

Can Bring

  • A watch without an audible alarm
  • A drink and/or snack for the break

Do Not Bring

  • Tablets, computers, cameras, or most other electronic devices
  • Highlighters, pens, colored pencils
  • Books or papers
  • Be sure to review phone and electronic device policy.

Timing

  • They should arrive at the test center by 7:30 a.m.
  • SAT Subject Tests™ end around 9:45 a.m., 11:15 a.m., or 12:30 p.m., depending on whether they are taking one, two, or three tests.

 

Band School Profile: Um guia para as universidades estrangeiras

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Muitos perguntam como as universidades estrangeiras vêem o Band e o rigor acadêmico do colégio.

As universidades pedem o “School Profile” para entender melhor o colégio. Esse perfil serve como um resumo do Band incluindo as aceitações recentes dos alunos.

Acabamos de atualizar o nosso Band School Profile e ele agora está disponível no site do Band: Band School Profile

Vale a pena conferir!

 

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