ACT: What to do today if you´re taking it tomorrow

Taking the ACT tomorrow? Don´t worry! Today is the day to relax, get some rest and prepare logistical items. See below for some tips:

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  • Print your admission ticket. This ticket has important details printed on it – you also won’t be able to take the test without it.
  • Know what time the test is and when you need to be there – standard check-in time is 8 am. If you’re late, you won’t be allowed to take the exam. Plan on getting there 15-20 minutes early so that you won’t be rushed (or late) if anything happens in the morning, like unexpected traffic.
  • Know where the test is, how to get there, and how long it’ll take you to get there. You can double-check the location on your admission ticket or at your ACT Account. Try using Google Maps to plan out the fastest route. Enter your arrive-by time for the next morning in addition to the testing center address and your starting point – Google Maps will tell you when to leave!
  • Have a wake-up plan, especially if you’re prone to oversleeping. Set multiple alarms, giving yourself an extra cushion of time (10-15 minutes) to get ready. Plan on having a family member wake you up as a backup plan.
  • Set out all your outfit for the next morning. Choose something you’d be comfortable sitting around in for several hours. Layers are a good idea, in case the testing room is warmer or colder than ideal.
  • Organize everything you need to bring for the test. There are only a few items you have to bring, but there are several other items that would be smart to have for the test:
    • Mandatory: Your admission ticket
    • Mandatory: Photo ID
    • Mandatory: Several sharpened #2 pencils
    • Good quality erasers
    • An approved calculator + extra batteries
    • A watch (without an audible alarm)
    • A bottle of water and snacks to eat during breaks. Officially, you won’t be able to eat or drink in the testing room, but you should have access to food + water during breaks.
  • Plan on leaving forbidden items at home. If you bring any forbidden items, you could jeopardize your scores. Here’s a list of items you should leave at home:
    • Any electronic device aside from your calculator and watch (no smart watches, obviously)
    • Anything with an alarm
    • Any writing utensils or tools aside from your #2 pencils
    • Any pamphlets or papers
    • Dictionaries or other books
    • You can find more info on prohibited behavior here – basically, just listen to directions and be polite and you’ll be fine

A note about cell phones: If you don’t have to bring it, then don’t. If you do choose to bring your phone, make sure it’s turned off and out of reach during the test and during breaks. If it goes off at any point – even if it’s an innocent alarm – all of your scores will be canceled.

You might be feeling pressure to cram as much info as you can into your brain the night before the test. You want to make sure you remember as much stuff as possible, right?

Well, stressful cramming might do more harm than good. The ACT isn’t a test where memorizing factoids will help you perform better – the best preparation strategy is a long-term one.

Ultimately, there are a couple of ways you could “prep” for the ACT the night before the test without stressing yourself out. Here are your options:

1. Don´t prepare at all

2. Briefly review key concepts or problems

The most important thing is to get some rest and relax the night before the exam!

Washington Univ St Louis to Visit Band – Fun Facts!

On April 12 at 9:40am we will have Dartmouth, New York University, Northwestern, Vanderbilt and Washington University in St Louis visiting Band. This week we posted fun facts about each of the visiting colleges – one per day and in alphabetical order.

Today we will focus on Washington University in St Louis. Did you know that?

  • Some rankings include:
    • #2 in social work (U.S. News & World Report, 2016)
    • #2 best college dorms (The Princeton Review, 2016)
    • #5 best undergraduate business schools (Bloomberg Businessweek, 2014)
    • #9 best-run colleges (The Princeton Review, 2016)
    • #10 best architecture schools (Architectural Record, 2015)
    • #13 best quality of life (The Princeton Review, 2016)
  • Students come from over 80 countries and all 50 states + the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.
  • About 350 undergraduate student groups and more than 150 graduate student groups in 2015-16
  • 80% of students pursue multiple majors and/or minor
  • About 75% of undergraduates participate in intramural sports, in more than 30 all-male, all-female and coed teams
  • $613 million total research support in fiscal year 2015. More than 3,000 research projects underway each year

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